What do you now know many years later

General software. From trouble with the Banyan Tree to OCP Art Studio, post any general software chat here. Could include game challenges...
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uglifruit
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by uglifruit »

Alessandro wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:07 pm
"Automata" is the plural of αὐτόματον, which in ancient Greek means "something acting (ματον) by itself (αὐτό)". I pronounce it as in ancient Greek, following the Erasmian convention which is commonly accepted here for academic use here: "ou (as in "loud") -TOH-mah-tah".
My ancient Greek is crap. I can only just book a hotel room with an ensuite bathroom, and order drinks at the bar in ancient Greece.
Last edited by uglifruit on Wed Sep 16, 2020 6:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Morkin
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by Morkin »

Alessandro wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:07 pm
Morkin wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:46 am
uglifruit wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 10:30 pm
I came across his company's slogan "There's no blood in our games, it's Automata sauce" and realised the pronunciation of the company name Automata must have intended to be aw'toe'mar'ta which I'd always pronounced aw'tom'uh'ta in my head. That blew my mind!
That's new to me too. I used to pronounce it "AW-toe-MATE-ah", until I heard Paul J on the Spectrum Show pronouncing it differently... :shock:
"Automata" is the plural of αὐτόματον, which in ancient Greek means "something acting (ματον) by itself (αὐτό)". I pronounce it as in ancient Greek, following the Erasmian convention which is commonly accepted here for academic use here: "ou (as in "loud") -TOH-mah-tah".
As I recall, I originally couldn't decide whether to pronounce it like we say "automaton" in English (with the stress on the 'o'), or "automation" (one letter difference but with the stress on the 'a' part). Mind you, I often pronounce things incorrectly so this would just be another one.. :lol:
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by presh »

Ralf wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 1:37 pm
8 is transparent / unchanged - so if you do PRINT INK 7; PAPER 8; "SOMETHING", the text will have white INK but the existing PAPER colour of each cell will remain unchanged
Wouldn't it be the same as simply PRINT INK 7; "SOMETHING" ?
No, because it will use the current paper colour for the background.

So if you had a red screen (PAPER 2: CLS), then set PAPER 0 somewhere down the line, then did PRINT INK 7; "SOMETHING" you would see SOMETHING in white ink on a black background instead of red.

(click images for legible versions!)

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presh
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by presh »

I thought software developers used to develop on the actual machine, albeit with disk drives / microdrives (to reduce the ball-ache of reloading during Z80 crashes/debugging), and an assembler etc. I imagined that was where all the +3s were, I rarely saw them in the wild!

I now understand (from Bob Pape's book, I think) that they used higher-powered computers to assemble the code, then flashed it into the Speccy's memory via the I/O port at the back. Neat!

(It's a moot point for me though, as I was too young for even a paper round nor any form of income to afford me such toys!)
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Alessandro
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by Alessandro »

uglifruit wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:12 pm
My ancient Greek is crap. I can only just book a hotel room with an ensuite bathroom, and order drinks at the bar in ancient Greece.
Don't worry, my knowledge of ancient Greek is even more limited than that: I can just understand words and expressions like ti estì, entelechéia, pantà rhei, arché and a few others. :)
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RMartins
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by RMartins »

A few months back, I found out that a friend of mine in chuckie egg, never jumped to the ladders, because he thought that it didn't work.
And I was pretty sure that I did it all the time, so I showed him how to do it.

The trick (that I assumed everybody knew) is to jump to the ladder and while "flying" over it, press up or down, so that it grabs the ladder.

I was shocked that he could even fully enjoy the game, without using that feature :)
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cmal
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by cmal »

RMartins wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:56 pm
A few months back, I found out that a friend of mine in chuckie egg, never jumped to the ladders, because he thought that it didn't work.
And I was pretty sure that I did it all the time, so I showed him how to do it.

The trick (that I assumed everybody knew) is to jump to the ladder and while "flying" over it, press up or down, so that it grabs the ladder.

I was shocked that he could even fully enjoy the game, without using that feature :)
That's another thing I only found out recently. Did not know this back in the day!
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by Joefish »

Alessandro wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 7:15 pm
uglifruit wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 5:12 pm
My ancient Greek is crap. I can only just book a hotel room with an ensuite bathroom, and order drinks at the bar in ancient Greece.
Don't worry, my knowledge of ancient Greek is even more limited than that: I can just understand words and expressions like ti estì, entelechéia, pantà rhei, arché and a few others. :)
I've had a plate of chips in Modern Greece that tasted like they were cooked in Ancient Grease.
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cmal
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by cmal »

smurphboy wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:36 pm
GreenCard wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 4:16 pm
smurphboy wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 3:18 pm
That there is a code for the teleport in Starquake that you can see on screen and then type in, to get to that area which is otherwise inaccessible. I just read the list of codes in a mag!
I've played that game to death since I was a kid, and until now I've been totally unaware of this! Any idea what the code is? I must see this inaccessible area! I *must* see it! :shock:
AMIGA in the bottom left. There is a sign next to a dead body and you can see the teleport on the next screen but only the code will let you in. You need it if there is a core part in that section.
I have the original cassette and while scanning stuff today I noticed that someone wrote all the codes inside the inlay. It must've been my brother wrote them. He was very into Starquake.

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Cosmium
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Re: What do you now know many years later

Post by Cosmium »

Turtle_Quality wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 8:37 am
I ordered my Spectrum the day after it's launch, and so got it pretty early. When I asked Quicksilver at a ZX Microfair if they had any games ready, they offered to buy my Spectrum as they still didn't have one ! But since kids were forced to write their own or wait in 1982, I wonder how many famous software developers started with that push...
I also ordered my 16K Spectrum shortly after launch and used the time in the preceding weeks (months?) before its arrival to eagerly plan out my own versions of the arcade games of the day... in an old school book no less!
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