Which games really pushed the Speccy?

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Ralf
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by Ralf » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:15 am

For me it's obvious that Knight Lore pushed the limits. It pushed the limits as they were in 1984 when it was released.

By the way, Manic Miner pushed the limits of 1983 too ;) None of earlier games had so much sprites on screen or similar ingame music.
Nevertheless I remember reading that it has quite ineffective engine and actually with some improvements could run twice as faster. So what? If it ran twice as fast, it would be unplayable. It was good for its time and ahead of the competition.
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stupidget
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by stupidget » Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:49 am

I remember getting the Demo of Thunder Blade in Crash once and was incredibly impressed with what they'd managed to cram into the speccy:

https://spectrumcomputing.co.uk/index.p ... 96&id=5249
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RMartins
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by RMartins » Mon Jul 09, 2018 10:16 am

Since no one mentioned it yet, Renegade was a real game changer for fighting games.

And I'm not sure if anyone mentioned it yet, but Elite was also a breakthrough due to the depthness and sense of infinite space it provided.

Commando and R-Type, which were already mentioned, also brought a new level of gameplay to the speccy, with a faithful but functional Arcade port with all those enemies and bullets at the same time on screen and massive scrolling going on.
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Juan F. Ramirez
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by Juan F. Ramirez » Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:16 am

I of the Mask seems to be another candidate. Technically amazing by that year (1986) but boring as hell.

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PaddyC13
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by PaddyC13 » Mon Jul 09, 2018 11:53 am

There were so many of what appeared at the time "firsts" in the 1980s. This was not just on the Spectrum but other machines as well. Most of us did not have the technical nous to determine if what was being done pushed the limits of the machine. For me, it was whether I went "wow". :-) A couple of examples, the spinning planets demo on the BBC Micro, The Ghostbusters theme/intro on the C64 and Tasword on the Spectrum. With hindsight, none of these pushed the hardware but I was impressed by them.

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beanz
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by beanz » Mon Jul 09, 2018 12:49 pm

Football Manager was pretty impressive for a basic game...still as addictive today as it always was. I guess that was pushing the limits of a game written in basic.
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stupidget
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by stupidget » Mon Jul 09, 2018 1:13 pm

I've just done a comparison between the 48k and 128k versions of Road Blasters. The 48k is painfully slow and almost unplayable and the sides of the road are empty where as the 128 version is at least twice as fast, has lines at the side of the road to give an idea of speed and obviously has better sound effect and is a single loader. So does this mean that the 48k version was pushing the machine to the limit?
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ZXDunny
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by ZXDunny » Mon Jul 09, 2018 3:46 pm

stupidget wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 1:13 pm
So does this mean that the 48k version was pushing the machine to the limit?
I dunno, compare it to 48k Chase HQ and see if it was, or if the coder was useless :D
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Pegaz
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by Pegaz » Mon Jul 09, 2018 4:33 pm

Ralf wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 9:15 am
For me it's obvious that Knight Lore pushed the limits. It pushed the limits as they were in 1984 when it was released.

By the way, Manic Miner pushed the limits of 1983 too ;) None of earlier games had so much sprites on screen or similar ingame music.
Nevertheless I remember reading that it has quite ineffective engine and actually with some improvements could run twice as faster. So what? If it ran twice as fast, it would be unplayable. It was good for its time and ahead of the competition.
If its true, that the Stamper brothers withheld the game for about a year, though it was finished before Sabre Wulf and Underwurlde, then this means that the game was made in 1983, making it even more significant and definitely ahead of its time...

Regarding the importance of this game ... c64 users have been waiting for 34 years to get the proper KL port, which will be eventually finished, as well as Gunfright and Pentagram before.
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AndyC
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Re: Which games really pushed the Speccy?

Post by AndyC » Mon Jul 09, 2018 5:44 pm

ZXDunny wrote:
Mon Jul 09, 2018 8:28 am
Yes, games that pushed the hardware to do things it wasn't supposed to be able to do. KL was not one of these. But even if we were to include games that pushed people's expectations of what could be done then KL still won't make the grade - Isometric 3D was really nothing innovative by the time it came out, whereas Freescape was innovative; it hadn't been done before on the Spectrum to that degree.
I'm not a fan of Knightlore, but when it came out it certainly did raise the bar considerably in the overall quality of Spectrum games. Isometrics had been done, but not with the level of graphical finesse that Knightlore had. Indeed most games had to up there overall effort with graphics after Knightlore came out.

Now it looks dated, has clunky controls and massive gameplay flaws, but you have to look at it from a contempory point of view. If you don't then really the only things that come close to counting are some of the multicolor games of recent years, Freescape and maybe a Doom demo game. And it's entirely possible that you'll have to ditch those in a year or so when someone out-does them.
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