Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

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Morpheus
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Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by Morpheus » Thu Jul 12, 2018 5:38 pm

Hi
I am a bit out of the loop these days and was wondering what hardware and methods do most people use for saving progress for any programs they are working on. I am talking about a 48K Rubber Key or 48K+ only i don't have a +2/+3 and talking about real hardware not Emulators or do most people use the likes of Fuse or Speculator now for software development. I still have my old Microdrives but the cartridges are proving unreliable and replacements off eBay are proving to be just as flaky.
I was thinking of getting a Beta Disk Interface and a Gotek USB Drive
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R Tape loading error, 0:1

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Ast A. Moore
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by Ast A. Moore » Thu Jul 12, 2018 6:08 pm

I don’t develop on my Spectrums, though. I use them for testing my code, especially some model-specific code, but otherwise, I find it counterproductive. (Not to mention that avoiding the unnecessary stress on the old hardware by having it run hours on end is generally a good idea, too.)

However, I sometimes put the finishing touches on loading screen in Art Studio running on an actual Spectrum connected to a CRT TV, because no emulator or LCD will give you the correct colors. I then save the screen to tape and record the audio to my computer or phone. Then I convert it to a tape file. Simple and very reliable.
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by chequered flag » Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:18 pm

vDrive

Probably the least used hardware. Drop in replacement of real Microdrive.

https://vdrivezx.com/
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by Morpheus » Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:49 am

chequered flag wrote:
Thu Jul 12, 2018 7:18 pm
vDrive

Probably the least used hardware. Drop in replacement of real Microdrive.

https://vdrivezx.com/
I did have one reserved but had to let it go due to financial pressures I do like this solution a lot though.
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by Morpheus » Fri Jul 13, 2018 7:54 am


As I understand them the DivMMC "type" load games where you can use a NMI to get to a menu and save a snapshot file ( .SNA ) but pressing a NMI whilst writing a BASIC program just resets the Speccy which is why I looked at the vDriveZX. I just wondered what other people used, the answer seems to be an emulator and then real hardware at the end so far.
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by chequered flag » Fri Jul 13, 2018 9:37 am

DivMMC is much more than what is visible from the NMI menu.

You understand the concept of vDrive as 8 virtual Microdrive devices that you can insert virtual cartridges into in the form of MDR files.

DivMMC has similar concepts.
One virtual tape player connected to the EAR port. It is called "tapein".
One virtual tape recorder connected to the MIC port. It is called "tapeout".
Into these virtual tape devices you can insert virtual cassette tapes in the form of TAP files.

DivMMC also has virtual disk drives that you can insert virtual disks into in the form of TRD files.

DivMMC can also take snapshots but that is not what you want I recon.

Now that the concepts are in place maybe the manual makes sense.
https://www.sellmyretro.com/uploaded/im ... _b914a.pdf
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by chequered flag » Fri Jul 13, 2018 11:02 am

I was thinking of getting a Beta Disk Interface and a Gotek USB Drive
Just realized: DivMMC virtual disk drives are Beta Disk with TR-DOS.

TR-DOS is still unfamiliar to me...
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by cha05e90 » Fri Jul 13, 2018 12:29 pm

While I use my DivMMC Future with my 48k ZX Spectrum setups the mentioned vDriveZX is the one I use with my ZX Spectrum 128. I must admit that I'm slightly disappointed I can't use the DivMMC as a "tape replacement" for the 128 one (in 128 Basic!) - it does only work in 48k mode.

So for "serious" 128 usage the DivMMC seems to be rather useless (or maybe it's my fault...:-)).
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Re: Modern methods of saving BASIC programs

Post by 1024MAK » Fri Jul 13, 2018 1:20 pm

The DivMMC is a development of the DivIDE and as such the limitation of saving is not that of the hardware, but of the operating system that is being used. For example, for the DivIDE there are at least five different operating systems. Some of these are more than capable of writing any file (including BASIC programs) to the mass media when the Spectrum is in '48k' mode. But as the driving force was a system to make loading of games easy and quick, this is the area that got the most attention. So there was less development in other areas. DivIDE was actually designed as a hard disk drive interface. But as there was no standard Sinclair hard disk operating system, some of the DivIDE operating systems actually simulate floppy disks, microdrives etc.

Using in these in '128k' mode is a little tricky, due to the way that the 128 ROM switching takes place. Interception of the single 48k ROM is well understood. But in a 128k machine there are either 2 ROM images in one physical ROM chip (128k and +2) or four ROM images in two physical ROM chips (+2A, +2B, +3 and +3B). Hardware then has to snoop on the Spectrum to work out which ROM image is currently selected, otherwise the interface will page it's own ROM in at the wrong time.

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