REVIEWS COURTESY OF ZXSR

Schizoids
by David H. Lawson
Imagine Software Ltd
1983
Crash Living Guide Issue 01, February 1984   page(s) 47

Producer: Imagine, 16K £5.50
Imagine come up with some of the best games - this isn't one of them. You're supposed to clear the space lanes of civilisation's debris by bulldozing it into a black hole in the centre of the screen. The graphics are black and white, though nicely drawn but the game is confusing. Joystick; Fuller.


Transcript by Chris Bourne

Crash Living Guide Issue 02, March 1984   page(s) 48

Producer: Imagine, 16K £5.50
Imagine come up with some of the best games - this isn't one of them. You're supposed to clear the space lanes of civilisation's debris by bulldozing it into a black hole in the centre of the screen. The graphics are black and white, though nicely drawn but the game is confusing. Joystick; Fuller.


Transcript by Chris Bourne

Crash Living Guide Issue 03, April 1984   (1984-03-16)   page(s) 64

Producer: Imagine, 16K £5.50
Imagine come up with some of the best games - this isn't one of them. You're supposed to clear the space lanes of civilisation's debris by bulldozing it into a black hole in the centre of the screen. The graphics are black and white, though nicely drawn but the game is confusing. Joystick; Fuller.


Transcript by Chris Bourne

Sinclair User Issue 16, July 1983   page(s) 29

LACKING IMAGINATION

DESPITE the glossy advertisements, Spectrum games from Imagine Software seem to be only average. The first program to be released is Arcadia. The player controls a spaceship at the bottom of the screen and waves of enemy fighter swoop in, dropping bombs. There is a series of levels to the game and on each level the spaceship Arcadia faces a different foe.

The colour and explosion effects in the game are unusual and the range of space invaders was interesting but the game lost its appeal after a few hours and became just another version of beat the evil nasties.

The second game also gave a good first impression but that wore off after play. The game centres on a black hole which sucks in all the garbage of the universe. The player controls an inter-galactic refuse collector.

The rubbish is displayed as three-dimensional cubes and pyramids and the collector must push it into the black hole. If the collector gets too near the black hole it will be sucked in.

Both games are for the 16K and 48K Spectrum and cost £5.50 each. They can be obtained from Imagine Software, Mason's Buildings, Exchange Street East, Liverpool, Merseyside, L2 3PN.


OverallNot Rated
Transcript by Chris Bourne

Computer & Videogames Issue 19, May 1983   page(s) 98

WELL, IT'S A VERY GOOD IDEA, BUT...

Spectrum Schizoids is one of the best ideas for a game to arrive on the C&VG reviews desk for several weeks.

You are at the wheel of an intergalactic Space-Dozer charged with the unfortunate task of having to bulldoze refuse from all over the galaxy into a black hole.

Your dozer can be made to thrust forward, rotate left and right and 'flip' - which has the effect turning the machine instantly through 180 degrees to face in the opposite direction.

The controls for the dozer are very much in the style of asteroids - and indeed the space refuse comes at you from all four corners of the screen in Asteroids-fashion.

The space debris spirals towards you in three dimensional geometric shapes. There are cubes, diamond shapes, hexagons, rectangles and bars and all in different shapes and sizes.

One of the strongest features of Schizoids is the three dimensional movement of the shapes.

The dozer itself is quite difficult to manoeuvre and will take you a lot of practice to master it.

As you drift around the screen, drift because the dozer has inertia, you must be careful not to tumble into the black hole yourself.

The black hole has a slight gravitational pull and can suck you down even if you don't make contact with any of its spike edges.

The secret of shunting the shapes towards the hole is to make sure you catch them head on with your shovel. If they touch the side of your vehicle they will explode it.

Despite an excellent idea and clever programming with good graphics, I did feel that the playability of the game left a little to be desired.

It is very difficult to move the pieces of debris and control the dozer at the same time. Furthermore, the debris has a tendency to stick to the dozers shovel, or get entangled in the skyhook at the rear. With a little bit more care a good idea could have been turned into a really good game. What we are left with is an average game but not quite up to the standard of Arcadia, and not up to the high standard we have come to expect from Imagine software.

The game runs on a Spectrum in 16 or 48k and is available at £5.50 from the Liverpool-based firm.


Getting started9/10
Value6/10
Playability6/10
Transcript by Chris Bourne

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